Login Register
 °

Artists have it taped in Letchworth

By The Advertising Stevenage  |  Posted: June 30, 2010

By Susan Sudal

STICKY SITUATION: Arty Letchworthians will be looking to emulate the work of artist Mark Jenkins, who creates sculptures using Scotch Packaging Tape from 3M

STICKY SITUATION: Arty Letchworthians will be looking to emulate the work of artist Mark Jenkins, who creates sculptures using Scotch Packaging Tape from 3M

Comments (0)

LIFE-size sticky tape sculptures of famous people linked with Letchworth are set to appear in the Garden City this autumn, thanks to a Letchworth Arts Centre project backed by the Heritage Lottery Fund's Young Roots programme.

Inspired by the work of the American artist Mark Jenkins, the sticky tape sculptures are made by casting objects in sticky tape, like a cast on a broken arm.

The Sticky Tape Figures from History project will combine local history, investigative research and the creation of original works of art and the Arts Centre is now inviting groups and individuals to take part.

The aim is to engage local people in making a journey of discovery about the town and people connected to it who have had an impact on the nation.

Up to 20 groups will be able to join in the project. Their 20 sculptures will be exhibited in September as part of an outdoor heritage trail throughout the town, followed by a month-long exhibition of the sculptures in the Main Gallery at the Arts Centre in 2011.

The Arts Centre will be providing workshops run by experienced artists where groups will learn the art of sticky tape modelling. It will also provide the sticky tape!

There are many people, both living and dead, with a connection with Letchworth Garden City who are significant to the history of the country.

Laurence Olivier, for example, made his acting debut in 1924 at St Christopher School's Theatre, appearing as Lennox in a production of Macbeth.

Ebenezer Howard, pioneer of the Garden City movement, invented a shorthand-typing machine, but sadly, it was never put into production. You can see two prototypes at the Heritage Museum. George Orwell, who was pretty uncomplimentary about Letchworth in his novel The Road to Wigan Pier, lived in nearby Wallington.

Groups taking part should use their local contacts to select a figure to investigate. Word-of-mouth research, involving interviewing long-term residents of the town, would be an excellent starting point. And the First Garden City Heritage Museum is a fount of useful information.

The Arts Centre, at 2 The Arcade (01462 670788) is happy to provide information and supply application forms. The forms can also be downloaded from www.letchwortharts.org.

Read more from The Advertiser

Do you have something to say? Leave your comment here...

max 4000 characters

YOUR COMMENTS AWAITING MODERATION

 
 
 

MORE NEWS HEADLINES